Wednesday, September 12, 2007

Monikers

Grandmother. Grammy. Gammie. Gran Ma. Grandmom. Grans. Nana. Nonna. Mams. MeMaw. Mom-Mom. Bubbie.

Grandfather. Gramps. Gran Pa. Granddad. Paw Paw. Pa Pa. Poppie. PePaw. Pop-Pop. Zaddie.

So what do (or will) your children call you parents? Is is a variant of Grandmother/Grandfather? Or is it based on an ethnic or cultural tradition?

I ask because I find it fascinating. My son calls my parents Mom-Mom and Pop-Pop, a long tradition in our family. My in-laws are Jewish, so they are Bubbie and Zaddie. As I was waiting to drop off J at preschool there were a few grandparents there, so I hear different nicknames. I rarely hear the same names we use for J's grandparents. I thought I did today, but turns out it was only a close approximation.
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Happy New Year to my Jewish Blogging friends! In fact, I'm amazed how many of you are out there. I need your help, I think. As DH and I settled that we would raise the young 'uns Jewish, I'm a bit at a loss. His schedule is so busy, he's not much help with the religious rearing. We are not much for services. So how does your family celebrate the New Year? Any contemporary type dishes? (I have to admit, I'm not much of a kosher chef)

7 comments:

Leah said...

Here is what Megan calls her various grandparents... My in-laws are "Grandma" and "Grandpa." Nice and classic, eh? My Mom is "Grandma Sharon." My Dad and his wife are "Grandpop Goofy and Grandmom Pat." As you can imagine, my father is a giant clown so he has always been called Grandpop Goofy by all the grandchildren (over 30 of them, including his wife's family!).

I didn't know my Mom's parents, but for my Dad's parents, we called them "Pop Pop" and "Mom." Yes, we called our Grandmother "Mom." Didn't seem weird at the time...

Geohde said...

I think that my father would deny that he was old enough to be any permutation of 'grandfather'. The future youn'uns will just have to use his name :)

Courtney said...

Thank you for educating me on Rosh Hashana. I really like the symbolism of the day and I hope that maybe it will mean something for me personally, and for the rest of us in blogland.

Rachel said...

We just have a family dinner. We totally do not keep kosher, so we don't even think about those things. We have gifilte fish with home made horse radish, chicken soup with knadles, and usually brisket. Sometimes we have tzimmes or sometimes kugel. I have the *best* kugel recipe in the world. It's a milk dish, though. If you would like the recipe, let me know.

I called my grandmothers Nana and my grandfater Pop. My parents are Grammie and Grampie, though.

niobe said...

I missed this post and I guess it's probably too late now, but the only special things that my family (which means my grandmother, since my parents weren't that into Jewish holidays) ever had for Rosh Hashanah were the traditional apples dipped in honey and the round challah.

bethkyle said...

This is kind of late...but my nieces and nephews call my parents Nana and Papa. We called my grand parents Mom LastName and Dad LastName. I don't know why we never called them Grandma and Grandpa. My maiden name is Bell, so Mom Bell got shortened to Ma Bell a lot.

Malky B. said...

On Rosh Hashanah there is also a tradition to eat pomegranites or "chinese apples" - cute that you have them on the top of your blog. There are also different foods that we eat that symbolize that we should have a good,fruitful,etc year. Some of them are: dates,leeks,fish,fish head,carrots,beets,squash to name a few.